Boosted attendance at Saskatoon’s MS Walk drives excitement

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“MS Canada Hosts Annual MS Walk in Saskatoon to Raise Funds for Research and Support Services

On a sunny Sunday in Saskatoon, MS Canada organized its annual MS Walk to raise funds for research and programs aimed at improving the quality of life for individuals living with multiple sclerosis. With a collective fundraising goal of over $4 million in 2024, the event attracted over 300 participants, including volunteers like Jackie Pilon, who herself was diagnosed with MS.

The Impact of MS on Individuals and Society

Canada has the highest rates of MS in the world, with approximately 4,000 individuals in Saskatchewan alone living with the disease. For Jackie Pilon, the diagnosis of MS in 1992 and a subsequent allied disease in 2015 changed the course of her life, forcing her to reconsider her plans for family and career. Despite the challenges, Pilon found a sense of community and purpose through her volunteer work with MS Canada, participating in her ninth walk this year.

Supporting Research and Building Community

Dr. Katherine Knox, a rehabilitation doctor specializing in MS, emphasized the importance of the support provided by MS Canada in funding research initiatives within Saskatchewan. The organization’s investment in research is crucial for advancing our understanding of the disease and developing effective treatments.

Inspiring Hope and Resilience

As the MS Walk concluded, the sense of community and solidarity among participants was palpable, inspiring hope and resilience in the face of this challenging disease. Individuals like Jackie Pilon continue to show that a diagnosis of MS is not the end, but rather the beginning of a new journey filled with opportunities for growth and connection.

As we reflect on the success of the MS Walk and the stories shared by participants, it is evident that together, we can make a difference in the lives of those impacted by MS. By supporting research, raising awareness, and fostering a sense of community, we can work towards a future where MS no longer poses a barrier to living a fulfilling and meaningful life.

In the end, the MS Walk is not just a fundraising event; it is a symbol of hope, resilience, and unity in the face of adversity. It reminds us that by coming together as a community, we have the power to create positive change and improve the lives of individuals living with MS.

Let us continue to walk, support, and advocate for those affected by MS, ensuring that they receive the care, resources, and opportunities they deserve. Together, we can make a difference and bring us closer to a world free of multiple sclerosis.”



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